Getting started in stock analysis PDF

Getting started in stock analysis PDF

Getting started in stock analysis PDF ( Illustrated edition) The purpose of this book is beyond explaining the indicators and their meaning. It is designed to show how the combined use of fundamental and technical indicators can be put into action to create an effective program to build a portfolio, manage its risks, and time entry and exit based on ever‐changing indicators. This helps generate additional income while preserving the conservative standards that most investors need and want.

Category: Stock

Author: Michael Thomsett

Language: English

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Introduction- Getting started in stock analysis PDF

Do you favor fundamental or technical analysis?
Many market observers favor either fundamental analysis or technical analysis, exclusively. But both offer value, in different ways. This book makes a case for using both systems together to identify quality companies and their stocks, and to then time trades to increase profits and improve timing of trades.
Fundamental analysis is often associated with conservative and long‐term investing. It is the reliance on financial statements and other financial information about a company, intended to identify the levels of capital safety and strength, as well as earnings potential. The drawback of fundamentals is that the information is outdated by the time it is used; for example, financial statements normally are issued several months after the end of the fiscal year.

Technical analysis is focused exclusively on current price and trading volume information: the study of price movement in the stock versus the fundamental emphasis on financial attributes of the company. Price is judged on charts, with the shape and speed of price movement used to anticipate trends and reversals. Reliance is not only on the price level itself but also on volume of trading, moving averages of the price over time, and momentum of trading.

The drawback of technical analysis is that none of the indicators can be relied on consistently; short‐term price movement is random, so technical analysis is not an exact science. Even with the drawbacks of fundamental and technical analysis, many analysts recognize that the two disciplines affect one another, and are clearly related. Used together, investors and traders may improve
the selection of stocks and the timing of trades to improve profitable outcomes in their portfolios.

The idea that combined use of two different approaches to analysis could produce improved results is intriguing. For many years, great energy has been put into perfecting analysis, notably with widespread use of automated systems and advanced algorithms, methods of calculating likely movement of price based on variables. The algorithm is too complex to calculate by hand, so high‐frequency traders (HFTs) rely on sophisticated programs to time large‐dollar value trades based on very small changes in price. This technical system today accounts for as much as 50 percent of all trades on U.S. markets. Other issues surrounding the problems associated with HFTs and regulating them highlight the growing importance of this trading trend. Interest in automated systems that give an edge to some traders over others has led to controversy and even regulatory steps to curtail high‐frequency trading activity.

The advantage that HFT trading provides is clear; but it is less clear how much negative impact the practice has on individual trading. The high concentration of dollars traded has led to many losses among institutions, but for individuals the impact is not as clear. This book is concerned with methods that investors and traders can use to improve overall profitability in investing and trading stocks, not as part of larger‐volume trading practices but in the management of an individual portfolio. The premise is that a typical individual does not have access to algorithms and other tools, and must rely on exceptional analytical methods to beat the averages of market investing and trading. To accomplish this goal, the book is designed to present the basics of both fundamental and technique analysis in two parts.

It includes analysis of market theories and what they mean; charting analysis and interpretation, trends; and moving averages. This section also provides chapters on price indicators, volume indicators, momentum oscillators, and confirmation.

The purpose of this book is beyond explaining the indicators and their meaning. It is designed to show how the combined use of fundamental and technical indicators can be put into action to create an effective program to build a portfolio, manage its risks, and time entry and exit based on ever‐changing indicators. This helps generate additional income while preserving the conservative standards that most investors need and want.

Table of Contents- Getting started in stock analysis PDF

part I: fundamental analysis

chapter 1: financial statements in overview

chapter 2: how reliable are the financial reports?

chapter 3: balance sheet ratios—testing working capital

chapter 4: income statement ratios—trends and profits

chapter 5: five key trends every investor needs

chapter 6: the annual report and what it reveals

chapter 7: fundamentals not on the statement

part II technical analysis

chapter 8: theories and what they mean

chapter 9: charting and its value

chapter 10: trends and how to study them

chapter 11: moving averages and their value

chapter 12: price indicators

chapter 13: volume indicators

chapter 14: momentum oscillators

chapter 15: confirmation, the key to timing

___

Part I (Fundamental Analysis) contains seven chapters designed to introduce and examine the essential fundamental sources—financial statements, annual reports, and fundamentals not found in reports. This section also explores the many ratios and trends that are valuable to anyone employing the fundamentals to select companies as viable investment candidates. The section also devotes an entire chapter to a detailed analysis of five key trends every investor needs to track, including an explanation of how to track and interpret them.

Part II (Technical Analysis) provides an equally in‐depth examination of the major technical attributes and indicators and has eight chapters.

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About the author

Michael Thomsett (ThomsettOptions.com) has written more than 80 books on investing, real estate, business, and management. He is the author of several Wiley books, including the nine editions of the bestselling Getting Started in Options as well as Getting Started in Fundamental Analysis, Getting Started in Real Estate Investing, and Getting Started in Swing Trading. He also has written numerous other stock investing and trading books, including Winning with Stocks (AMACOM Books), Stock Profits (FT Press), and Mastering Fundamental Analysis and Mastering Technical Analysis (Dearborn Press).

He contributes regularly to many websites, including Seeking Alpha and the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE), and writes articles for the AAII Journal and NAIC’s Better Investing. He also teaches five classes at the New York Institute of Finance (NYIF). Thomsett has been writing professionally since 1978 and full-time since 1985. He lives near Nashville, Tennessee.

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